The awkward conflict of sales

Do you ever feel awkward about charging for your therapies? Do you ever feel that you are charging too much, or feel as though you should be offering your therapies for free?

With complementary therapies not widely available on the NHS, clients seek us out to help with their problems. But the monetary cost can be expensive.


If we as therapists can help someone overcome health issues but there is a financial obstacle, we would rather remove the obstacle in order for the therapy to go ahead.

There also seems to be an expectation to give away free taster sessions, or perhaps reduced rate treatments in order to allow people to try the therapy and perhaps pay for a full treatment at a later date. But is this marketing technique effective?

People like a freebie or a bargain and likely not want to pay for further sessions. Those serious about using the therapy as a method of regular relaxation and overall healing will prioritise financially in order to pay for it.

As a reflexologist I have invested a lot of time, money and energy into my training and my continued learning and experience. I feel the rate at which I charge is appropriate to that. However I am always open to negotiation if it means that I can continue to practice and help other people.

Jackie Marsden MAR is a qualified reflexologist and independent consultant (Team Leader) for Neal’s Yard Remedies Organic. Jackie leads and mentors a growing team of consultants (many of whom are therapists integrating organic products into their existing businesses) via the NYRO social selling channel, holding regular team meetings, one-to-one coaching via phone and facetime, and a closed facebook group. All views are my own.

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Holistic Approaches for Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological condition which affects around 100,000 people in the UK. Most people are diagnosed between the ages of 20-40, but it can affect younger and older people too. Roughly three times as many women have MS as men. [1]

MS is when the body itself attacks the myelin sheath in an auto-immune response. The myelin sheath’s function is to insulate the nerves. When it is compromised it causes the neurotransmitters to function less effectively, slowing or blocking messages between body and brain. This creates tingling sensations, fatigue, tremors, pain and trouble balancing.

Dr Mercola states “While your body does have the ability to repair myelin naturally, this process tends to become less effective as you get older. Now, however, researchers [from University of Cambridge] have uncovered a natural option that might play a major role in boosting the repair of damaged myelin in people with MS: vitamin D.”[2] This emerging research is also presented by the Multiple Sclerosis society.[3]

I have been aware of MS right from the beginning of my reflexology career through my tutor, Julie Crossman, and her experience with her close and continued work with MS sufferers. During my training and professional career it is always the nervous and digestive systems I focus on within a reflexology session for an MS sufferer. A course of Reflexology Lymph Drainage would aim to help too from the auto-immune angle: isolating the immune system reflexes intends to boost and seek rebalance.

Delayed nervous responses such as moving a hand away from a hot surface, or weakening bladder control can be debilitating. The latter example causes further problems because many sufferers deliberately drink less to try to reduce this symptom but in doing so can cause bowel problems and constipation. Less water is not going to help anyone: our bodies need around two litres per day to carry out its vital functions.

ID-100140238My advice alongside following a healthy diet (full of fresh fruit and vegetables and a good water intake), would be to take a high quality Multi Vitamin and Mineral supplement, alongside a Vitamin D supplement (ensuring you intake lots of leafy greens too), Vitamin B complex, as well as boosting your antioxidant levels. The NYRO supplements are superior because they are plant-based and organic, and are synergistic blends. Vitamins and minerals don’t work in isolation so it is important to take a good quality Multi Vitamin and Mineral supplement alongside a healthy diet to give yourself a good foundation.

Reflexology can also be beneficial from an emotional angle. Dr Mercola states “More often than not, some form of hidden emotional wound can also be found in patients suffering with autoimmune diseases like MS.” This has also been my findings from other readings of the condition by Ann Gillanders. The profound relaxation that reflexology invokes can create an emotional release for some people.

[1] https://www.mssociety.org.uk/what-is-ms

[2] http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/12/21/vitamin-d-multiple-sclerosis.aspx?e_cid=20151221Z2_DNL_art_2&utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art2&utm_campaign=20151221Z2&et_cid=DM93237&et_rid=1273927785

[3] https://www.mssociety.org.uk/ms-research/emerging-areas/vitamin-d

Jackie Marsden MAR is a qualified reflexologist and independent consultant (Team Leader) for Neal’s Yard Remedies Organic. Jackie leads and mentors a growing team of consultants (many of whom are therapists integrating organic products into their existing businesses) via the NYRO social selling channel, holding regular team meetings, one-to-one coaching via phone and facetime, and a closed facebook group. All views are my own.

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What is Stress?

We all talk about stress in our lives, but what actually is “stress” and what does it do to our bodies? How can we be more aware and what can we do to help ourselves?

This blog offers an introduction to the topic of stress.

Our Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) is the important part of our nervous system which controls our vital bodily functions such as our heart beating and our breathing.stress

It is split into two divisions: Parasympathetic and Sympathetic. The two sides work in an integrated and complementary fashion. When one is stimulated the other one is suppressed.

When we face any type of stress, whether it’s fear, anxiety, danger or worry, our nervous system reacts in exactly the same way: it prepares to “fight or flight”. This is because it senses a threat and it works to keep us safe. So whether you are running across a road of speeding traffic, or whether you are anxious about a looming work deadline, the body will be reacting in exactly the same way.

The sympathetic division predominates. A release of adrenalin instructs the body to prepare for “fight or flight”.

Blood vessels supplying the heart, limbs, head and brain dilate enabling more blood and oxygen to reach these body parts in preparation for physical activity.

Blood pressure and heart rate rises, as does respiratory rate.

The brain and eyes are also on full alert, improving concentration and peripheral vision.

Sugar is released into the blood system for the anticipated need for additional energy. This happens in the liver.

In order to conserve energy, the blood vessels supplying the non-essential systems of the body constrict, suppressing the digestive and immune systems.

The stomach and small intestine become inhibited, delaying digestion, the onward movement of food, and the absorption of nutrients.

Once the perceived threat has gone, the body will revert back to normal and rebalance: homeostasis will be resumed.

But in our modern day life, the perceived threat might go on and on for days, weeks, months or even years. Anxiety and worries can take all sorts of forms, such as work/job worries, financial worries, health worries, deadlines, long working hours, relationships: the list is endless.

As you can imagine, the ability to relax will be difficult: the body being on constant high alert. Problems include difficulty sleeping, feeling run down, constantly catching colds and viruses due to the suppressed immune system. Good nutrition will also be compromised with the suppressed digestive system, causing Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), diarrhoea, constipation etc.

It’s so important that we get a balance in our lives: time for work and time to rest/relax. We need time to allow the parasympathetic nervous system to predominate, and then allow the body time to rebalance.

This is where reflexology and other holistic therapies can be so beneficial. A regular session booked into the diary will break the constant stress cycle, and give you and your body an hour to lie back and relax: me time.

Reflexology, in particular, can be very beneficial in providing profound relaxation because of the high concentration of nerve endings in the feet: the feet are great access points for the whole body.

Jackie Marsden MAR is a qualified reflexologist and independent consultant (Team Leader) for Neal’s Yard Remedies Organic. Jackie leads and mentors a growing team of consultants (many of whom are therapists integrating organic products into their existing businesses) via the NYRO social selling channel, holding regular team meetings, one-to-one coaching via phone and facetime, and a closed facebook group. All views are my own.

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Reflexology for sleep problems – a perspective

Sleep is such an important part of our lives, but what actually is sleep and what does it do for us?

During sleep, your body is working to support healthy brain function and maintain your physical health. In children and teens, sleep also helps support growth and development.

The damage from sleep deficiency can harm you over time. For example, ongoing sleep deficiency can raise your risk for some chronic health problems. It also can affect how well you think, react, work, learn, and get along with others. [1] Researchers have linked poor sleep to a number of ailments, from short-term memory loss and behavioural problems, to weight gain, diabetes, and even increased risk of cancer, just to mention a few. [2]

If we spend too much time indoors, in a windowless office during the day and in front of the TV, computer screens and mobile phones in the evenings, insomnia can soon set in because our brains struggle to determine what time it is.  sleep

The combination of light deficiency during the day and excessive light exposure at night causes your biological clocks to get out of sync.

A 30-60 minute exposure to outdoor light every day helps to anchor our circadian rhythm. [2] This means that our master clock is set to be awake and alert during the day and to rest and sleep during the night.

After sustained periods of sleep disruption, we can be left feeling agitated, grumpy, stressed and on high alert. It then becomes ever more difficult to get to sleep, and thus becomes a stress in itself, and the cycle continues.

Reflexology can also help with problems like this, as it allows a time and place for deep relaxation to occur. The appointment is in your diary. You are expected to lay back. You are expected to maybe close your eyes. You are expected to relax. Once in a state of deep relaxation, the body can begin to switch off the “high alert” and allow the parasympathetic nervous system to do its work, increasing digestion, immunity, libido, and most importantly here, providing a good environment for resetting the master clock to promote a healthy sleep pattern.

Combine regular reflexology with reduced time spent in front of TV and computer screens, particularly in the evenings, reduced consumption of stimulants during the evenings (such as alcohol and caffeine), and a good dose of outdoor light during the day, and you should be well on your way to a better night’s sleep.

For more of me on sleep, melatonin and circadian rhythm see my other blog post on the Winter Blues.

Jackie Marsden MAR is a qualified reflexologist and independent consultant (Team Leader) for Neal’s Yard Remedies Organic. Jackie leads and mentors a growing team of consultants (many of whom are therapists integrating organic products into their existing businesses) via the NYRO social selling channel, holding regular team meetings, one-to-one coaching via phone and facetime, and a closed facebook group. All views are my own.

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[1] http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sdd/why

[2] http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/12/10/dangers-sleeping-too-much.aspx?e_cid=20151210Z2_DNL_art_1&utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20151210Z2&et_cid=DM92051&et_rid=1256832826

Image courtesy of Ambro at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Combating Winter Colds and Viruses

ID-100231025It’s that time of year again when the weather turns colder, the central heating goes on, and windows tend to be closed, creating a breeding ground for winter colds and viruses.

There are simple ways of combating the prevalent cold virus, and this is more in prevention rather than cure.

Immune system

Our immune system needs regular boosting so that it is ready to fight any invaders. Do this by eating lots of fresh fruit and vegetables, preferably organic. Fruit and vegetables are full of antioxidants, which fight those free radicals which are released within the body to attack.

A regular vitamin C supplement can also help boost the immune system, optimising it for attack. Have you ever drunk a glass of organic juice and noticed its acidic effect on the digestive system? This is caused by the ascorbic acid. The vitamin C supplement I use contains Calcium Ascorbate instead, which is slow release, non-acidic form of vitamin C.

Stress will also damage our immune system, prioritising our adrenalin and sympathetic nervous system, and thus neglecting those systems that are not needed for immediate survival such as immune and digestion. A regular session of reflexology can help reduce stress and evoke relaxation.

Vitamin C

Patrick Holford’s advice re. vitamin C absorption is to take around 2 grams every 4 hours. This will saturate the tissues with vitamin C and thus flushing out the cold virus, maintaining a high level of immune protection. [1] This will completely blow the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) out of the water, however vitamin C is water soluble and thus the body cannot store excess amounts in fat – it simply excretes via the kidneys.

The RDA was written years ago based on the nutritional value of our foods after the war – nowadays our foods are nutritionally poorer due to the depleting quality of our soil. This is why I advocate an organic based diet and lifestyle. If we don’t adopt this way of life our future foods will be nutritionally worthless.

Antioxidants

berry complexI have been using the Organic Berry Complex to continually saturate my body’s tissues throughout the day, particularly if I know I’m going to be busy with clients, driving long distances or late nights. Whiz up 2 scoops of the complex with some sprigs of mint and a blender jug full of water. Add a glug of Elderberry syrup to give a deeper taste and a richer content. It tastes amazing, so refreshing and the children love it too. Take a small glass of it regularly throughout the day to top up.

The supplements created by Neal’s Yard Remedies Organic are superior in the way they work because they are synergistic blends of carefully selected and sourced vitamins and minerals. Vitamins and minerals work with each other to do their jobs efficiently – not in isolation.

[1] Patrick Holford The Optimum Nutrition Bible pg. 289 How to kill a cold

Jackie Marsden MAR is a qualified reflexologist and independent consultant (Team Leader) for Neal’s Yard Remedies Organic. Jackie leads and mentors a growing team of consultants (many of whom are therapists integrating organic products into their existing businesses) via the NYRO social selling channel, holding regular team meetings, one-to-one coaching via phone and facetime, and a closed facebook group. All views are my own.

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Do you suffer from the Winter Blues?

I always feel a little sad during August. Towards the end of this month the long summer days are noticably getting shorter and the summer holidays are drawing to a close. Businesses and shops are no longer focussing on summer products and are now looking at autumn/winter collections.

Inevitably, the autumn and winter will be soon upon us. Are you one to suffer with the winter blues? Some people suffer with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), which although the actual cause is still unknown, it is thought to be a depression brought on with the shorter days, lack of daylight and darker mornings. Symptoms include low mood and lack of interest in life (1).

Lack of sunlight is suggested to cause an upset in the balance of the endocrine glands situated in the brain, and thus the production of the hormones serotonin and melatonin. Serotonin is known to influence mood, social behaviour, sleep and memory, whereas melatonin is connected to the body’s natural circadium rhythm (natural body clock), sensing the onset of darkness/night time and thus makes us sleepy at the right time.(2)

Reflexology would aim to help improve the symptoms of SAD, with a treatment plan focussing on the endocrine, digestive and nervous systems (note that serotonin is also produced in the intestines). A course of treatments would endeavour to rebalance the body, asking the body to ignite its self-healing processes, and thus improve mood and feelings of lacklustre.

Alternatively, the Lumie Bodyclock Iris 500 might be able to help. (3) An alarm clock and aromatherapy diffuser all-in-one combines light therapy with aromatherapy to gently wake you up in the morning and help you fall asleep at night. The Lumie is designed to reset your natural bodyclock and provides relief with its wonderful alternative to the usual jolting alarm clock sound.

The light source turns on gradually in the last 30 minutes of your sleep, mimicking a natural sunrise. This alongside your favourite essential oil (geranium or lemon for example) helps you ease into the day gently. The lamp can also be used in the evening to help you fall asleep, thus encouraging the natural secretion of melatonin and natural onset of sleep, alongside the appropriate essential oil, such as lavender.

The Lumie has two separate chambers for essential oils which makes it easy to switch between essential oil blends, one for night time and one to wake up to.

Lumie

The Lumie is not just for people suffering with SAD, but can also be a wonderful aid for boosting energy levels, healthy sleep patterns and improved sports training. The Lumie is available from my webshop, or alternatively order with  me direct via phone/email to receive £25 worth of complimentary aromatherapy oils of your choice for to get you started.

(1) http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Seasonal-affective-disorder/Pages/Introduction.aspx

(2) Ross and Wilson Anatomy and Physiology in Health and Illness 12th Edition

(3) https://uk.nyrorganic.com/shop/jackiemarsden/area/shop-online/category/burner/product/9383/lumie-bodyclock-iris-500/

Jackie Marsden MAR is a qualified reflexologist and an independent consultant for Neal’s Yard Remedies Organic. All views are my own.

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Are you getting enough Vitamin O?

What am I talking about? Oxygen.

I’m no expert on yoga/breathing/meditation, however what I learn and find useful for myself, I always share where needed, particularly with my clients.

Many people come to me with stress-related issues, anxiety, sleep problems. Our minds wander and we worry, we ask:

  • Why me?
  • Why (insert loved ones name here)?
  • Why did it happen?
  • I wished it hadn’t happened
  • I’m worried it will happen
  • … the list could go on but you get the idea.

While we’re wasting our time doing this, our bodies are responding with the “fight or flight” response. Heart rate quickens, blood pressure increases, our immune and digestive systems start slowing. Our breath becomes shallow.

We need something to get away from the mind’s futile worrying. What could be easier and more opportune than our breath? Take some deep, slow breaths. Allow the oxygen to fill up our chests, our tummies, our whole bodies. Sweep in through the nose, and if you can, out through the nose, if not slowly and gently through the mouth. Try counting 1,2,3,4 as you inhale, 1,2,3,4 as you exhale. Add in some pauses. Count 1,3,3,4 after every inhale and exhale.

These simple techniques should help you tune out your mind’s babble and focus on the present moment. What is actually bothering you right now at this present moment? Nothing.

Posture during these breathing exercises is important too. If you’re doing them in bed in the middle of the night then you should be horizontal and comfortable. Make sure you’re warm and you can relax your muscles. If you’re sitting then it might be useful to use a small cushion to “prop up” your seat bones (those bony bits in your bottom cheeks). Tilting the pelvis forward like this will shift the spine straighter and open up the chest area, allowing more space.

During my reflexology treatments, my sequence always starts with the diaphragm line, followed by lung reflex, to help calm the breath and aid relaxation.

When we breathe we are literally giving our whole bodies oxygen: what could be more holistic?

The breath is so obvious that it often gets overlooked, but this is one of the greatest tools we have to help ourselves.

Are you getting enough Vitamin O?

Jackie Marsden MAR is a qualified reflexologist and independent consultant (Team Leader) for Neal’s Yard Remedies Organic. Jackie leads and mentors a growing team of consultants (many of whom are therapists integrating organic products into their existing businesses) via the NYRO social selling channel, holding regular team meetings, one-to-one coaching via phone and facetime, and a closed facebook group. All views are my own.

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